‘The Voice of the Violin’: Art and Social Justice at American Biograph Co.

posted in: Early moving pictures | 3

  “When we come into our own there will be no high, no low, and all will be equal” reads the sign at a meeting of “social justice” warriors in Biograph’s 1909 feature film, “The Voice of the Violin.” D.W. … Continued

Millennials and the End of Classic Cinema

posted in: Writer's notebook | 0

Like many others who grew up loving classic Hollywood movies, I’ve been discouraged to find those feelings not shared by so-called millennials and others in the digital age. I noticed this first some years back when I made the mistake … Continued

When Cinema Was of Two Minds

In the beginning, the movies were of two minds. … One belonged to D.W. Griffith and the other to Mack Sennett. Both young men arrived at the Biograph Co. in the year 1908, each filled with fight and vision and … Continued

Film Censorship and the ‘McClellan Massacre’

posted in: Early moving pictures | 6

      “Art belongs to the young — born in the passions of loins and hearts, not in the abstractions of mature minds.” – Terry Ramsaye in “A Million and One Nights: A History of the Motion Picture Through … Continued

Billy Bitzer: Close-up on ‘one black hell’

posted in: Early moving pictures | 1

  Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas this week sent me looking for an old friend who photographed the aftermath of the horrific Galveston hurricane of 1900. The great G.W. “Billy” Bitzer was a cameraman at American Mutoscope and Biograph … Continued

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